Recorded in his studio the album features 13 new original tracks in varied styles.

Phil is of course known primarily as a blues performer, & his forays into folk, country & instrumental areas are tinged with his unique way of approaching his music.

The title track 'Migrants Dance' pt 1 & pt2 has been spectacularly successful at live performances, & Phil has enlisted the talents of violinist Nigel MacLean on this & three other tracks.

Rural themes of yesteryear in 'Dreamin' 1930 Blues' & 'Search For Money' fit into the blues zone, alongside the stylistically true blue pieces 'Railyard Rumblin' (one-take-composed on the spot) & 'Big Boyfriend'.

Personal insights & experience permeate 'Hold The Line', 'Field Of Green' & much of the album generally, while 'Bordertowns' laments the poor condition of the mighty Murray River.

This is an album Phil can be proud of as his talents as a songwriter, performer & singer grow to match his already unquestionable ability on guitar.

Album Reviews

In short: Troubadour with a heart shares his passions.

One of the best gigs on the scene is a night with Phil Manning and Geoff Achison, their solo slots and shared sets a magical experience.

At such a gig at the Clifton Hill Hotel last winter, Manning introduced the title trOne of the best gigs on the scene is a night with Phil Manning and Geoff Achison, their solo slots and shared sets a magical experience.
At such a gig at the Clifton Hill Hotel last winter, Manning introduced the title track of this album as a work in progress.
The reaction was one of instant and universal approval.
It is split into parts for Manning's latest album and, with Nigel MacLean on violin; the instrumental is easily the highlight of a heart-on-the-sleeve record.
Employing a mix of Irish and Australian folk styles and mixing them with some blues, the veteran guitarist addresses concerns with the environment, looking for work and a world of changing, but not for the better.
Some of the lyrics will raise a smile, while other are raw, but few leave any doubt that Manning thinks that now is the time to act.
Still, he is at his most eloquent on the instrumental.

Lee Howard, Sunday Herald Sun

Bluesman Phil Manning goes back to the roots for his new session Migrants Dance.

The Devonport-born guitarist uses a rural theme for the 13 original tunes.
Each has a deep message about nature and the environment, but not necessarily a greenie message.

The title work, in two parts, features fine violin by Nigel McLean to enhance the mood.
Border Towns is homage to the neglected state of Australia's greatest waterway the Murray River, now in a desperate state & largely unnavigable.

Manning's music dances, bounces and breathes, each song offering up it's own spirit.
The music is acoustic, in keeping with his current solo career away from the legendary band Chain.

Chris Copas, The Examiner

Aussie bluesman Phil Manning has been forging a leading career on our shores for thirty years both in Chain and as an honest solo performer.
Can't Stop, The Back Shed, Two Roads, Take Note and now Migrants Dance reveal Phil's importance as a singer songwriter.

Migrant's Dance displays his superb finger picking slide guitar style and his Australian sensibility.
Here is a mature musician troubadour singing about our issues, our concerns.
Many of these issues are of course universal, but "now I'm here in Footscray West with a girl she is the best" doesn't ring very strongly of Chicago.

Phil Manning has his won distinctive style, rooted in American blues, but textured by decades of performance.
Migrants Dance Pt 2 is a lively instrumental piece now getting ABC airplay.
Hold The Line tells fine stories, Big Boyfriend is a traditional Delta blues, and the reflective The One is especially appealing.

Steve Baker, ABC